Dallëndyshe

Elina Duni Quartet

Sale!
EN / DE

On Dallёndyshe (“The Swallow”), her second ECM album, Elina Duni sings songs of love and exile. The troubled history of the Balkan regions has inspired many such songs and the pieces here, primarily from Albanian traditional sources, are interpreted with intensity and insight by Elina and her band. The Tirana-born and Swiss-raised singer has become an exceptional musical storyteller embodying the songs’ narratives, in a way that transcends genre definitions and language limitations.
“This time there is a sense of lightness to the feeling and energy of the album,” says Duni. “Even though we are dealing with tragic themes of exile it is not as dark as [the ECM debut] Matanё Malit.” In its sense of drive, Dallёndyshe opens up “a different groove, a different momentum. It’s become more rhythmic. Sometimes it’s almost a trance-like propulsion.”
The programme of Dallёndyshe also looks to the Albanian diaspora. The last two songs on the album, “Ti ri ti ti klarinatё” and the title track are, respectively, from the Arvanitas and Arbёresh communities of Greece and Italy. In the wider world Elina still finds herself asked frequently to define her music. It has clearly become more than a hybrid of ‘jazz’ and ‘folk’.
Dallёndyshe was recorded in July 2014 at Studios La Buissonne in Pernes-les-Fontaines in the South of France, and produced by Manfred Eicher.

Auf ihrem zweiten ECM-Album Dallёndyshe (“Die Schwalbe”) singt Elina Duni von der Liebe und dem Exil. Die bewegte Geschichte der Balkanregionen hat viele solcher Lieder inspiriert und die Stücke auf diesem Album – hauptsächlich aus traditionellen albanischen Quellen stammend – werden von Elina und ihrer Band mit Leidenschaft und tiefem Verständnis interpretiert. Die in Tirana geborene und in der Schweiz aufgewachsene Sängerin hat sich zu einer außergewöhnlichen musikalischen Geschichtenerzählerin entwickelt, die die Erzählungen in den Songs so verkörpert, dass Genre-Definitionen und Sprachbarrieren obsolet werden.
„Dieses Mal haben wir ein Gefühl der Leichtigkeit in der Stimmung und der Energie des Albums“, sagt Duni. „Obwohl wir uns mit tragischen Themen des Exils befassen, ist es nicht so düster wie [das ECM-Debüt] Matanё Malit.“ In rhythmischer Hinsicht entfaltet Dallёndyshe „einen anderen Groove, eine andere Wucht. Es ist rhythmischer ausgefallen. Stellenweise hat es eine fast trancehafte Gangart.“
Das Programm auf Dallёndyshe umfasst auch einen Blick in die albanische Diaspora. Die letzten beiden Stücke, “Ti ri ti ti klarinatё” und der Titelsong, stammen aus den Arvanitas- und Arbёresh-Gemeinden in Griechenland und Italien. In der übrigen Welt sieht Duni sich noch immer häufig mit Fragen nach einer Definition ihrer Musik konfrontiert. Diese hat sich zu eindeutig mehr als einem bloßen Hybrid aus „Jazz“ und „Folk“ entwickelt.
Dallёndyshe wurde im Juli 2014 in den Studios La Buissonne im südfranzösischen Pernes-les-Fontaines aufgenommen und von Manfred Eicher produziert.
Featured Artists Recorded

July 2014, Studios La Buissonne, Pernes les Fontaines

  • 1Fëllënza
    (Muharrem Gurra)
    06:03
  • 2Sytë
    (Isak Muçolli)
    05:09
  • 3Ylberin
    (Traditional)
    05:05
  • 4Unë në kodër, ti në kodër
    (Traditional)
    06:12
  • 5Kur të pashë
    (Traditional)
    04:48
  • 6Delja rude
    (Traditional)
    05:19
  • 7Unë do të vete
    (Traditional)
    04:59
  • 8Taksirat
    (Traditional)
    03:27
  • 9Nënë moj
    (Traditional)
    04:14
  • 10Bukuroshe
    (Traditional)
    04:16
  • 11Ti ri ti ti klarinatë
    (Traditional)
    02:49
  • 12Dallëndyshe
    (Traditional)
    02:46
EN / DE
On Dallёndyshe (“The Swallow”), her second ECM album, Elina Duni sings songs of love and exile. The troubled history of the Balkan regions has inspired many such songs and the pieces here, primarily from Albanian traditional sources, are interpreted with intensity and insight by Elina and her band. The Tirana-born and Swiss-raised singer has become an exceptional musical storyteller embodying the songs’ narratives, in a way that transcends genre definitions and language limitations. “If we can tell a story with the music and the listeners travel with us, then the goal is reached.” A story, she points out, can be transmitted in many ways, not only through lyrics, but also through the evocation of a melody, through the feeling conveyed in the performance of a song, and through the solos of the band members.

Finding the songs and adapting them for the quartet is a new challenge each time: “From song to song we work differently. When it’s the four of us together, each person brings something in. We might begin with patterning of bass and drums from Patrice and Norbert, and then Colin adding something and me putting a line on top by finding another way to sing or phrase a melody. On this particular album Colin also brought in a couple of complete arrangements, which was very helpful. I’m lucky to be working with these subtle musicians who help me to bring out the poetry and avoid any sentimental tendencies. With the folk ballads there can be a danger of over-emphasising the pathos.” Alert to this, the players underline the spirit of a song without being merely illustrative.

“This time there is a sense of lightness to the feeling and energy of the album,” says Duni. “Even though we are dealing with tragic themes of exile it is not as dark as [the ECM debut] Matinё Malit. One of the fascinating things about music of the Balkans, in a lot of the folk music, is the idea that the pain has to be sung. And in singing you go beyond it. That’s what the blues is about, of course, and you find a similar sensibility in these Albanian songs about exile and lost love. In some Balkan music, you dance away the pain - and songs that seem at first to be joyful, from the rhythms and the melody, turn out to be not at all joyful when you listen more closely. This is a characteristic quality in music of the region.”

In its sense of drive, Dallёndyshe opens up “a different groove, a different momentum. It’s become more rhythmic. Sometimes it’s almost a trance-like propulsion.” A good instance of the new energy is beautifully expressed in “Sytë”, written by Isak Muçolli and made famous by Albanian diva Nexhmije Pagarusha. Elina performed for Pagarusha in Paris on the occasion of the legendary singer’s 80th birthday and was subsequently very encouraged by her enthusiastic response to the Duni Quartet’s mining of the repertoire. “I was very pleased to do this piece associated with her, and I like our treatment of it. It’s got the desert in there somehow, and this rhythm that Colin sets up, it lifts you into another world.”

The programme of Dallёndyshe also looks to the Albanian diaspora. The last two songs on the album, “Ti ri ti ti klarinatё” and the title track are, respectively, from the Arvanitas and Arbёresh communities of Greece and Italy. “The Arbёresh are Arvanites who went from the North of Greece, the Peloponnese, to Italy in the 15th century, crossing the sea to escape the Ottoman Empire. In Greece they’ve been assimilated into the Greek population in the last hundred years but in Italy they’re still a strong community, speaking a very old Albanian. And the musical differences are very interesting. The Arvanitas music has a pronounced Byzantine influence and the Arbёresh music does not, but you find pieces that are close to the Italian tarantella, for instance. You can see what happened to the music after the split.”

Duni’s journey to the emotional centre of Albanian song began a decade ago, when she and Colin Vallon were students at Berne’s Hochschule der Kunste. Looking at Albanian folk music rather than jazz standards as an improvisational resource led them to a whole range of discoveries. Elina found her own voice in the old songs, and in reclaiming them could also free them: the quartet’s experimental yet pure acoustic versions have been received with gratitude in Albania where folk themes were once harnessed for propaganda purposes.

In the wider world Elina still finds herself asked frequently to define her music. It has clearly become more than a hybrid of ‘jazz’ and ‘folk’. Indeed, touring in the wake of Matinё Malit the group felt they had outgrown the jazz clubs. This story-telling music, with chamber music colours and forms and strong and supple rhythms as well as an improvised component, now calls for a different kind of performance space as well as a differentiated response from its listeners.
Auf Dallёndyshe („Die Schwalbe“), ihrem zweiten ECM-Album, singt Elina Duni Lieder über Liebe und Exil. Die unruhige Geschichte des Balkans hat viele solcher Lieder hervorgebracht und die hier versammelten, die vor allem aus der albanischen Volksmusik stammen, werden von Elina und ihrer Band mit Intensität und Einfühlungsvermögen interpretiert. Die in Tirana geborene und in der Schweiz aufgewachsene Sängerin hat sich zu einer außergewöhnlichen musikalischen Geschichtenerzählerin entwickelt, die ihren Liedern eine Genre- und Sprachgrenzen überwindende narrative Form gibt. „Wenn wir über die Musik eine Geschichte erzählen und den Zuhörer mit auf die Reise nehmen können, haben wir unser Ziel erreicht“, erklärt Elina und betont, dass eine Geschichte auf vielerlei Weise mitgeteilt werden kann, nicht nur über den Text, sondern auch durch die Beschwörung einer Melodie, das Gefühl, das über das Lied transportiert wird und die Soli der Bandmitglieder.

Diese Lieder zu finden und für das Quartett zu adaptieren, ist jedes Mal eine neue Herausfor-derung: „Wir arbeiten bei jedem Lied anders, und wenn wir zu viert sind, steuert jeder etwas bei. Manchmal beginnen wir mit einem Bass/Drums-Muster von Patrice und Norbert, dann spielt Colin etwas dazu und ich setze noch eine Linie darüber, weil ich eine Idee habe, wie man die Melodie anders singen oder phrasieren könnte. Für dieses Album hat Colin außerdem zwei komplette Arrangements mitgebracht, was sehr hilfreich war. Es ist wirklich ein Glück, mit diesen feinen Musikern arbeiten zu können, die mir helfen, die poetische Qualität zum Vorschein zu bringen, ohne jemals ins Sentimentale abzugleiten. Gerade bei Balladen besteht immer die Gefahr, dass man das Pathos ein bisschen zu stark unterstreicht.“ Dieser Gefahr sind sich die Musiker bewusst – sie betonen die Seele des Songs, statt nur illustratives Bei-werk zu liefern.

„Dieses Mal wirkt das Album atmosphärisch und von der Energie her leichter“, meint Duni. „Obwohl es um das tragische Thema Exil geht, ist es nicht so düster wie ihr ECM-Debüt Ma-tinё Malit. Etwas, was mich an der Volksmusik des Balkans fasziniert, ist der Gedanke, dass man Schmerz heraussingen muss, um ihn zu überwinden. Das ist natürlich auch die Idee hinter dem Blues, und in diesen albanischen Liedern über Heimatlosigkeit und verlorene Liebe findet man eine ähnliche Sensibilität. Manchmal tanzt man den Schmerz auch weg und Lieder, deren Rhythmus und Melodie zunächst fröhlich scheinen, erweisen sich als überhaupt nicht fröhlich, sobald man genauer hinhört. Das ist das Charakteristische an der Musik dieser Region.“

In seiner besonderen Dynamik öffnet Dallёndyshe „einen anderen Groove, einen anderen An-trieb. Es ist stärker rhythmisch orientiert, hat mitunter einen fast tranceähnlichen Schub.“ Ein schönes Beispiel dafür ist das von Isak Muçolli komponierte „Syte“, das die albanische Diva Nexhmije Pagarusha berühmt gemacht hat. Elina sang es bei einem Konzert zum 80. Geburts-tag der legendären Sängerin in Paris und war danach sehr motiviert durch die begeisterte Re-aktion Pagarushas auf Dunis individuelle Leseart des Reper¬toires. „Es hat mir viel Freude gemacht, dieses Stück zu singen, das so viel mit ihr zu tun hat und ich mag unsere Version. Man kann die Wüste darin hören und dieser Rhythmus, den Colin aufbaut, lässt dich abheben in eine andere Welt.“

Dallёndyshe wirft auch einen Blick auf die albanische Diaspora. Die beiden letzten Lieder, „Ti ri ti ti klarinatё” und das Titelstück, stammen aus der Tradition der Arveniten und Arbёresh – albanischstämmigen Volksgruppen, die in Griechenland bzw. Süditalien leben. „Die Arbёresh sind Arveniten, die im 15. Jahrhundert auf der Flucht vor den Osmanen von Nord-griechenland nach Italien gingen. In Griechenland sind sie in den letzten 100 Jahren fast völlig assimiliert worden, aber in Italien haben sie sich als eigenständige Minderheit gehalten. Sie sprechen ein sehr altes Albanisch. Und die musikalischen Unterschiede sind hochinteressant. Die arvenitische Musik ist deutlich byzantinisch beeinflusst, während man bei den Arbёresh manchmal an die italienische Tarantella erinnert wird. Man hört, was nach der Trennung mit der Musik passiert ist.“

Dunis Reise in das emotionale Zentrum albanischer Volksmusik begann vor einem Jahrzehnt, als sie und Colin Vallon an der Berner Hochschule der Künste studierten. Albanische Lieder statt Jazzstandards als Improvisationsressource zu nutzen, führte zu einer ganzen Reihe von Entdeckungen. Nicht nur fand Elina ihre eigene Stimme in den alten Liedern, sie befreite sie auch von der Last der Vergangenheit: Die experimentellen, aber rein akustischen Versionen des Quartetts wurden in Albanien, wo Volkslieder früher für Propagandazwecke missbraucht wurden, mit Dankbarkeit aufgenommen.

In anderen Teilen der Welt muss Elina ihre Musik dagegen häufig erst erklären. Fest steht, dass sie mehr ist als ein Hybrid aus Jazz und Folk. Als die Musiker mit Matinё Malit auf Tour gingen, wurde ihnen klar, dass sie den Jazzclubs entwachsen waren. Diese Geschichten erzäh-lende Musik mit ihrer kammermusikalischen Farb- und Formgebung und den kraftvollen, geschmeidigen Rhythmen, verlangt nach anderen Veranstaltungsorten und einer differenzier-teren Reaktion des Publikums.
YEARDATEVENUELOCATION
2024March 02Methodist ChurchStamford, United Kingdom
2024March 11Teatri Skampa -Dita e VerësElbasan, Albania
2024March 15OdeonGöppingen, Germany
2024March 16Altes PfandhausCologne, Germany
2024March 23Bergamo Jazz FestivalBergamo, Italy
2024March 25Teatro FoceLugano, Switzerland
2024April 10Cully JazzCully, Switzerland
2024July 20KlosterkircheBlaubeuren, Germany
2024October 14SynagogeGiessen, Germany
2024November 24GitarrenfestivalBad Aibling, Germany