Officium Novum

Jan Garbarek, The Hilliard Ensemble

The inspired bringing together of Jan Garbarek and the Hilliard Ensemble has resulted in consistently inventive music making since 1993. The unprecedented “Officium” album, with Garbarek’s saxophone as a free-ranging ‘fifth voice’ with the Ensemble, gave the first indications of the musical scope and emotional power of this combination. “Mnemosyne” (1998) took the story further, expanding the repertoire beyond ‘early music’ to embrace works both ancient and modern.

Now, after another decade of shared experiences, comes “Officium Novum”, the third album from Garbarek/Hilliard, recorded, like its distinguished predecessors, in the St Gerold monastery. A central focus this time is music of Armenia based on the adaptations of Komitas Vardapet, pieces which draw upon both medieval sacred music and the bardic tradition of the Caucasus. The Hilliards have studied these pieces in the course of their visits to Armenia, and the modes of the music encourage some of Garbarek’s most impassioned playing. Alongside the Armenian pieces in the “Officium Novum” repertoire: Arvo Pärt’s “Most Holy Mother of God” in an a cappella reading , Byzantine chant, two pieces by Jan Garbarek, including a new version of “We are the stars”, as well as the Spanish “Tres morillas”. There is also a new account of Perotin’s “Alleluia, Nativitas”: the freedom of interpretation is testimony to the way the project as a whole has grown since its introduction on ECM New Series, with the Hilliard Ensemble now very much involved in the music’s improvisational processes and implications.

Featured Artists Recorded

June-July 2009, Propstei St. Gerold

Original Release Date

17.09.2010

  • 1Ov zarmanali
    (Traditional, David James, Gordon Jones, Jan Garbarek, Komitas Vardapet, Rogers Covey-Crump, Steven Harrold)
    04:11
  • 2Svjete tihij
    (Traditional, David James, Gordon Jones, Jan Garbarek, Rogers Covey-Crump, Steven Harrold)
    04:14
  • 3Allting finns
    (Pär Lagerkvist, Jan Garbarek)
    04:18
  • 4Litany: Litany / Otche nash / Dostoino est
    (Traditional, David James, Gordon Jones, Jan Garbarek, Rogers Covey-Crump, Steven Harrold)
    13:06
  • 5Surb, surb
    (Traditional, David James, Gordon Jones, Jan Garbarek, Komitas Vardapet, Rogers Covey-Crump, Steven Harrold)
    06:40
  • 6Most Holy Mother of God
    (Traditional, Arvo Pärt)
    04:34
  • 7Tres morillas m'enamoran
    (Traditional, David James, Gordon Jones, Jan Garbarek, Public Domain, Rogers Covey-Crump, Steven Harrold)
    03:32
  • 8Sirt im sasani
    (Traditional, David James, Gordon Jones, Jan Garbarek, Komitas Vardapet, Rogers Covey-Crump, Steven Harrold)
    04:06
  • 9Hays hark nviranats ukhti
    (Traditional, David James, Gordon Jones, Jan Garbarek, Komitas Vardapet, Rogers Covey-Crump, Steven Harrold)
    06:25
  • 10Alleluia. Nativitas
    (Traditional, David James, Gordon Jones, Jan Garbarek, Perotin, Rogers Covey-Crump, Steven Harrold)
    05:20
  • 11We are the stars
    (Traditional, Jan Garbarek)
    04:09
  • 12Nur ein Weniges noch
    (Giorgos Seferis)
    00:19
EN / DE

The inspired bringing together of Jan Garbarek and the Hilliard Ensemble has resulted in consistently inventive music making since 1993. It was the groundbreaking “Officium” album, with Garbarek’s saxophone as a free-ranging ‘fifth voice’ with the Ensemble, which gave the first indications of the musical scope and emotional power of this combination. “Mnemosyne”, 1998’s double album, took the story further, expanding the repertoire beyond ‘early music’ to embrace works both ancient and modern.

Now, after another decade of shared experiences, comes a third album from Garbarek/Hilliard, recorded, like its distinguished predecessors, in the Austrian monastery of St Gerold, with Manfred Eicher producing. Aptly titled, there is continuity in the music of “Officium Novum” and also some new departures. In ‘Occident/Orient’ spirit the album looks eastward, with Armenia as its vantage point and with the compositions and adaptations of Komitas as a central focus. The Hilliards have studied Komitas’s pieces, which draw upon both medieval sacred music and the bardic tradition of the Caucasus in the course of their visits to Armenia, and the modes of the music encourage some of Garbarek’s most impassioned playing. Works from many sources are drawn together as the musicians embark on their travels through time and over many lands. “Officium Novum” journeys from Yerevan to Byzantium, to Russia, France and Spain: all voyages embraced by the album’s dramaturgical flow, as the individual works are situated in a larger ‘compositional’ frame.

"Hays hark nviranats ukhti" and "Surb, surb" are part of the Divine Liturgy of the Holy Mass which Komitas Vardapet (1869-1935) arranged on different occasions and for different formations. The versions here derive from those made for male voices in Constantinople in 1914/1915. "Hays hark nviranats ukhti" is a hymn traditionally sung at the beginning of the mass while the priest spreads incense. "Surb, surb" (Holy, holy) corresponds to "Sanctus" in the Latin Mass.

"Ov zarmanali" is a hymn of the Baptism of Christ (Sunday after Epiphany), sung during the ceremony of blessing the water, and "Sirt im sasani" a hymn of "Votnlva" (the bathing-of-the-feet ceremony celebrated on Maundy Thursday).These Komitas pieces are from the period 1910 to 1915, but their roots reach back to antiquity. Ethnomusicologist as well as forward-looking composer-philosopher, Komitas not only showed how Armenian sacred music had developed from folk music, but used folk styles expressively, to make new art music for his era.

Other music in the “Officium Novum” programme also spans the centuries, medieval music and contemporary music unified in the concentrated approach of Garbarek/Hilliard, now definable as a specific group sound. Jan Garbarek contributes two compositions. For “Allting finns” the saxophonist sets “Den Döde” (“The dead one”), a poem by Sweden’s Pär Lagerkvist (1891-1974). “We are the stars”, meanwhile, last heard on the saxophonist’s “Rites” album, is based on a Native American poem of the Pasamaquoddy people.

Longest piece on the album is the thirteen-minute “Litany” imaginatively bringing together works of spiritual and musical affinity: “Otche Nash” from the Lipovan Old Believers tradition is preceded by a fragment of the “Litany” of Nikolai N. Kedrov.
Kedrov (1871-1940) was a student of Rimsky Korsakov, a founder of the Kedrov Quartet, a vocal group that toured under Diaghilev’s direction, and writer of many compositions and chant arrangements which have since found their way into the repertoire of Orthodox choirs.

Arvo Pärt’s “Most Holy Mother of God”, a piece written for the Hilliard Ensemble in 2003, is heard in a pristine a capella reading. If the Hilliards have proselytized persuasively for Pärt’s music they have surely also been affected by the austerity of his writing.

The Byzantine “Svete tihij” (Gladsome Light), composed in the third century, is one of the oldest Christian hymns, and once accompanied the entrance of the clergy into the church and the lighting of the evening lamp at sunset. The Spanish “Tres morillas” from the 16th century “Cancionero de Palacio” radiates a different kind of light, as its dancing rhythm underpins a tale of lost love.

Perotin’s “Alleluia. Nativitas” is a new account of a piece which the musicians had previously recorded on “Mnemosyne”: the freedom of interpretation is testimony to the way the project as a whole has grown since its introduction on ECM New Series.

As for the saxophone, from an improvisational perspective this remains an exceptionally pure context in which to experience Jan Garbarek’s creativity. Garbarek is still approaching this music freely, improvising with the soloists, creating roving counterpoint, weaving in and of the web of vocal texture, and helping to shape what England’s Evening Standard called “some of the most beautiful acoustic music ever made”.

The album concludes with actor Bruno Ganz reading Giorgos Seferis’s “Nur ein Weniges noch”, from the Greek poet’s 1935 “Mythistorema” cycle, a poem previously embraced in ECM’s album devoted to T.S. Eliot and Seferis, “Wenn Wasser wäre”.

New discoveries continue to be mined by the Hilliard/Garbarek collective. In an era in which musical alliances are often short-lived or speculative, ECM is able to present “Officium Novum” as a CD production of a ‘working band’ continuing to grow after 17 years of creative collaboration.

Seit Jan Garbarek und das Hilliard Ensemble auf Anregung von Manfred Eicher 1993 musikalisch zusammengefunden haben, hat ihr gemeinsames Musizieren immer wieder zu überraschenden, höchst innovativen Wendungen geführt. Das bahnbrechende Album „Officium“, mit Garbareks Saxophon als frei gestaltender „fünfter Stimme“ des Ensembles, vermittelte gleich einen starken Eindruck von der musikalischen Vielseitigkeit und emotionalen Kraft dieser Verbindung. Mit ihrem 1998 erschienenen Doppelalbum „Mnemosyne“ schrieben sie die Geschichte fort und erweiterten das Repertoire mittelalterlicher Vokalpolyphonie auch durch Werke zeitgenössischer Komponisten.

Nun, nach einem weiteren Jahrzehnt gemeinsamer Erfahrungen, gibt es ein drittes Album von Garbarek/Hilliard, das wie seine herausragenden Vorgänger im österreichischen Kloster
St. Gerold von Manfred Eicher als Produzenten aufgenommen wurde. Treffend betitelt, steht „Officium Novum“ für musikalische Kontinuität, aber auch für den Aufbruch in neue Gefilde. Dem Geist von „Occident/Orient“ folgend, richtet das Album den Blick ostwärts, nimmt Armenien ins Visier und fokussiert sich auf die Kompositionen und Bearbeitungen von Komitas Vardapet (1869-1935). Die Hilliards haben Komitas’ Werke, die in mittelalterlicher Kirchenmusik und der bardischen Tradition des Kaukasus wurzeln, bei ihren Besuchen in Armenien studiert, und Garbarek inspirieren die Stimmungen der Musik zu besonders intensivem Spiel. Auf der Reise durch Zeitalter und Länder haben die Musiker eine erstaunliche Vielfalt von Kompositionen zusammengetragen: „Officium Novum“ macht Station in Eriwan und Byzanz, in Russland, Frankreich und Spanien – und alles fügt sich ein in den dramaturgischen Fluss des Albums, weil die einzelnen Werke in einen größeren kompositorischen Rahmen eingebunden sind.

„Hays hark nviranats ukhti“ und „Surb, surb“ gehören zur Göttlichen Liturgie der Heiligen Messe, die Komitas zu verschiedenen Gelegenheiten und für unterschiedliche Ensembles arrangierte. Die hier zu hörenden Versionen basieren auf den 1914/15 in Konstantinopel entstandenen Fassungen für Männerstimmen. „Hays hark nviranats ukhti“ ist ein traditionell zu Beginn der Messe, während das Weihrauchfass geschwenkt wird, gesungener Hymnus. „Surb, surb“ (Heilig, heilig) entspricht dem „Sanctus“ der Lateinischen Messe.

„Ov zarmanali“ ist ein Choral zur Taufe Christi (Sonntag nach Epiphanias), der nach der Segnung des Wassers gesungen wird, und „Sirt im sasani“ ein Hymnus des „Votnlva“ (der rituellen Fußwaschung am Gründonnerstag). Diese Werke von Komitas stammen aus der Zeit zwischen 1910 und 1915, doch ihre Ursprünge reichen bis in die Antike zurück. Als Musikethnologe und progressiver Komponist/Philosoph zeigte Komitas nicht nur, dass sich die armenische Kirchenmusik aus der Volksmusik entwickelt hatte, sondern verwendete ganz bewusst volksmusikalische Stile, um daraus eine neue Kunstmusik für seine Epoche zu schaffen.

Auch andere Werke im „Officium Novum“-Programm überbrücken Jahrhunderte; in der konzentrierten Annäherung des Garbarek/Hilliard-Ensembles fließen mittelalterliche und zeitgenössische Musik zu einem charakteristischen Gruppenklang zusammen. Jan Garbarek steuert zwei Kompositionen bei. „Allting finns“ ist eine Vertonung des Gedichts „Den Döde“ (Der Tote) des Schweden Pär Lagerkvist (1891-1974), während „We are the stars“, zuletzt gehört auf Garbareks Album „Rites“, auf einem Gedicht der nordamerikanischen Pasamaquoddy-Indianer basiert.

Längstes Stück ist das dreizehnminütige „Litany“, in dem spirituelle und musikalische Einflüsse zusammengeführt werden: Dem aus der altorthodoxen Tradition stammenden „Otche Nash“ ist ein Fragment der „Litanei" von Nikolai N. Kedrow vorangestellt. Kedrow (1871-1940) war ein Schüler Rimsky-Korsakows, Mitbegründer des Kedrow-Quartetts, eines unter Leitung von Sergei Diaghilew konzertierenden Vokalensembles, und Urheber zahlreicher Kompositionen und Liedarrangements, die ihren Weg in das Repertoire orthodoxer Chöre gefunden haben.

Arvo Pärts „Most Holy Mother of God“, 2003 für das Hilliard Ensemble geschrieben, ist hier in makelloser A-capella-Klarheit zu hören. Die Hilliards haben sich auf überzeugende Weise für Pärts Musik eingesetzt, im Gegenzug sind sie sicherlich nicht unberührt geblieben von der Klarheit und Strenge seiner Kompositionen.

Das byzantinische „Svete tihij“ (Freudenreiches Licht), komponiert im dritten Jahrhundert, gehört zu den ältesten Chorälen des Christentums und begleitete einst den Einzug der Priester in die Kirche sowie das Entzünden der Abendlampe bei Sonnenuntergang. Das spanische „Tres morillas“ aus dem „Cancionero de Palacio“ des 16. Jahrhunderts verbreitet eine andere Art von Licht und untermalt mit seinem tänzerischen Rhythmus die Geschichte einer verlorenen Liebe.

Perotins „Alleluia. Nativitas“ ist die Neufassung eines Stückes, das bereits auf der CD „Mnemosyne“ enthalten war – die Freiheit der Interpretation belegt, wie sehr das Projekt als Ganzes seit seinen Anfängen in der ECM New Series gewachsen ist.

Was das Saxophon betrifft, bietet sich ihm aus improvisatorischer Sicht auch hier ein außergewöhnlich klarer Kontext, eine Offenheit für Jan Garbareks kreative Entfaltung. Auch diesmal nähert sich Garbarek der Musik frei, er improvisiert mit den Solisten, setzt irrlichternde Kontrapunkte, webt mit am Vokalgeflecht, spinnt Fäden weiter und wirkt mit an einem erneuten Beweis dafür, was der englische Evening Standard einmal „mit die schönste akustische Musik, die je gemacht wurde“ genannt hat.

Das Album endet mit Giorgos Seferis’ Gedicht „Nur ein Weniges noch“ aus dem 1935 entstandenen Zyklus „Mythistorema“, gelesen von Bruno Ganz, das bereits auf dem ECM-Album „Wenn Wasser wäre“ mit Gedichten von T.S. Eliot und Seferis zu hören war.

Das Kollektiv Hilliard/Garbarek schürft weiterhin nach verborgenen Schätzen. In einer Zeit, in der musikalische Allianzen häufig kurzlebig oder spekulativ sind, kann ECM mit „Officium Novum“ die CD-Produktion einer „working band“ vorlegen, die nach 17 Jahren erfolgreicher Zusammenarbeit immer noch an- und miteinander wächst.

YEAR DATE VENUE LOCATION
2024 May 04 Fjordjazz Sandefjord, Norway
2024 May 09 Festival Coutances, France
2024 May 11 Kongresshaus Zurich, Switzerland
2024 May 13 Cavatina Hall Bielsko Biala, Poland
2024 October 01 Sala Ziemi Poznan, Poland
2024 October 05 Kulturhus Hamar, Norway
2024 October 07 Weimarhalle Weimar, Germany
2024 November 09 Stadthalle St. Ingbert, Germany
2024 November 11 Schloss Elmau Krün, Germany
2024 November 15 Erholungshaus Leverkusen, Germany
2024 November 16 Otto-Flick-Halle Kreuztal, Germany
2024 November 18 Elbphilharmonie, großer Saal Hamburg, Germany
2024 November 25 National Philharmonic Hall Warsaw, Poland
2024 November 26 Baltic Philharmonic Hall Gdansk, Poland
2024 December 03 Prinzregententheater Munich, Germany