Tierra que anda

Silvia Iriondo

CD18,90 out of print
Featured Artists Recorded

March-April 2002, Studios Gaucho Records, Buenos Aires

Original Release Date

09.05.2005

  • 1Alas de plata (Silver wings)
    (Traditional)
    04:26
  • 2La arenosa (The sandy land)
    (Gustavo Leguizamón, Manuel Jose Castilla)
    03:05
  • 3Zamba de Ambato (Zamba for Ambato)
    (Delia Cazenave)
    05:59
  • 4La cocinerita (The little cook)
    (Traditional)
    02:02
  • 5De negras y negros (Of black girls and black boys)
    (Pepe Núñes)
    02:17
  • 6Vámonos vida mia (Let's go my life)
    (Traditional)
    02:30
  • 7Vidalero
    (Juan Quintero)
    03:59
  • 8Coplas al agua (Verses to the water)
    (Juan Quintero)
    02:34
  • 9Tun Tun
    (Margarita Palacios)
    01:05
  • 10Viejo cantor (Old singer)
    (Juan Quintero)
    02:22
  • 11Weque - Las barbas de mi chivato (Weque - The beards of my goat)
    (Traditional)
    05:34
  • 12Alpa puyo
    (Juan Quintero)
    02:59
  • 13La cruzadita (The crossed song)
    (Hermanos Núñes)
    04:23
  • 14La nostalgiosa (The nostalgic song)
    (Eduardo Falú, Jaime Dávalos)
    04:27
Argentina’s popular music has long been equated one-sidedly with the sounds of the Tango, associated primarily with Buenos Aires, the country’s capital. But there is a lot more to be heard in Argentina, and Silvia Iriondo’s “Tierra que anda” explores the musical resources of this vast country, from Tierra del Fuego in the extreme south and the northern provinces bordering on Bolivia, Paraguay and Brazil.
Singer Irionda describes “Tierra que Anda“ – “Walking Land” – as a musical journey through Argentina’s audible landscape, viewed through the eyes of some of its composers, but also taking account of traditional songs and native chants, and especially Afro-Peruvian, Bolivian and Andean roots which inform several of the pieces here.
For more than 30 years Silvia Iriondo has been restoring and rejuvenating Argentine popular music. In her country she has long been acknowledged as one of the most personal and versatile singers of the long forgotten traditional repertory of her country. “She is in full artistic maturity. Her slow and safe step shows that there is another way of singing folk”, wrote the newspaper Clarín.
Iriondo has worked with many leading South American musicians, includuing Egberto Gismonti, Mercedes Sosa und Dino Saluzzi. She created the multi media show “El Escuchado”, based on the life and work of Atahualpa Yupanqui, the foremost figure of Argentine folk music (1908-1992), and performed for Amnesty International.
Co-producer Egberto Gismonti writes in his liner notes that Silvia Iriondo’s main goal is to achieve a non-prejudiced relationship with Argentina’s musical past and future. She is certainly a unifier of styles and traditions. Gismonti concludes: “Your musical conception, in the arrangements and the vocal phrasing, astonishes me for the constant presence of an expectation of hope, faith and deep belief in the music of your country.”
Silvia Iriondo makes a rare visit to Europe in early May, promoting “Tiera que Anda” with concerts in Germany, Austria and Belgium. For more details consult Silvia’s own web site www.silviairiondo.com.ar